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Foeniculum Vulgare,

The fruit of both species has the same therapeutical application being stomachic and carminative par excellence.

NOM. VULG.—Anis, Sp.; Fennel, Eng.

CORIANDRUM SATIVUM, L. (Cuminum cynimum, Wall.) NOM. VULG.—Cominos, Calantro, Sp.; Coriander, Eng.

USES.—The fruit of both species has the same therapeutical application being stomachic and carminative par excellence. It yields an aromatic essential oil with stimulant properties, popular because of its agreeable odor and taste.

As a rule the infusion is given in doses of one liter a day (15–30 grams of the seeds to one liter of water). The essence and the alcoholate are also employed, the former obtained by distillation, the latter by macerating the fresh seeds in alcohol. The dose of the essence, 4–8 drops on a piece of sugar or in potion; the alcoholate, 2–10 grams in sweetened water or infusion of aromatic herbs.

Both plants are official in the Spanish Pharmacopoeia and they and their preparations are common in all drug stores.

HABITAT.—Common, cultivated in the gardens and well known.

BOTANICAL DESCRIPTION.—F. vulgare: Aromatic, stout, smooth herb, 4–6° high.

Leaves with many slender thread-like divisions. Large umbel of yellow flowers, no involucre and no involucels. C. sativum: Low aromatic herb, leaves pinnately compound, small umbels with few rays, flowers white.

Reference book: The Medicinal Plants of the Philippines

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