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Carum Copticum,

The fruit, of which both form and taste remind one of anise, is official in the Pharmacopoeia of India as a carminative, stimulant and antispasmodic

NOM. VULG.—Lamudio, Damoro, Tag.; Lamudio, Vis.; Caraway, Eng.

USES.—The fruit, of which both form and taste remind one of anise, is official in the Pharmacopoeia of India as a carminative, stimulant and antispasmodic. It is indicated in flatulent colic, atonic dyspepsia and diarrhoea and gives very good results. It has been used in cholera, but is of little value in that disease. In moderate doses it increases salivary and gastric secretion.

The P. of India contains the 2 following official formulæ: Oleum—obtained from the fruit by distillation; is colorless when fresh but soon turns yellow; possesses the odor of the fruit and an acrid, burning taste. Aqua—600 grams of the fruit ground and mixed with 9 liters of water; this is distilled till 4½ liters have gone over, these constituting the “aqua cari.” DOSE.—1–2 drops of the essential oil in emulsion or on a piece of sugar. Of the “aqua,” 30–60 grams as a carminative or to disguise the taste of other drugs (such as castor oil), thus frequently preventing nausea or vomiting.

BOTANICAL DESCRIPTION.—Leaves finely pinnately compound. Common petiole clasps the stem at the base. Flowers white, in flat compound umbels. The secondary peduncles 12. Flowerets of each partial umbel about 16. Calyx of flowerets superior, 5 globose sepals. Corolla, 5 equal petals, with rounded lobules. Stamens 5. Ovary tuberculate. Styles 2, very short. Seeds 2, united, furrowed and nearly glabrous at maturity.

HABITAT.—Cultivated in gardens. Blooms in October.

Reference book: The Medicinal Plants of the Philippines

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