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Combretace

The kernel is edible and has a very agreeable taste. It yields about 50% of a fixed oil, sweet and savory.

Terminalia Catappa, L. (T. molucana, Lam.; T. mauriciana, Blanco.) NOM. VULG.—Talisay, Tag.; Almendro, Sp.-Fil.; Talisay, Banilak, Nato, Hitam, Vis.; Kalisay, Pam.; Lugo, Pandan, Iloc.; Indian Almond, Indo-Eng.

USES.—The kernel is edible and has a very agreeable taste. It yields about 50% of a fixed oil, sweet and savory. If left for some time, it deposits an abundance of stearin. It closely resembles oil of sweet almonds for which it, as well as the oil of Pili (Canarium commune, L.), which we have already described, makes a good substitute.

The trunk bark is astringent and in decoction is used for atonic diarrhoea and as a lotion for ulcers.

DECOCTION.— Bark (ground and pounded) 12 grams.

Water 150 grams.

Simple syrup 40 grams.

To be given by the tablespoonful in 24 hours.

BOTANICAL DESCRIPTION.—A tree, 6–8 m. high. Branches horizontal and radiating from the trunk. Leaves purplish, bunched, cleft at the base, sometimes transversely ovate, sometimes oval, notched, glabrous. Petiole very short.

Flowers axillary, racemose, with a scale at the base of the peduncle, some hermaphrodite and others lacking pistils. Staminate flowers: calyx downy within, with 5 lobes. Corolla wanting. Stamens 10, inserted on the calyx.

Hermaphrodite flowers: pistil same length as stamens. Drupe, fleshy, inferior, oval with the borders turned upward containing a very hard and fibrous nut; seed long and sharp-pointed.

HABITAT.—Common in Luzon. In Manila it is cultivated extensively as an ornamental tree, especially along the Sabana Walk, General Solano Ave. and in Sampaloc and Malacañan.

Reference book: The Medicinal Plants of the Philippines

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