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Typographical Style

Every newspaper and magazine has its own distinct typographical style in capitalization, abbreviation, punctuation, hyphenation, and the use of numerical figures.

Every newspaper and magazine has its own distinct typographical style in capitalization, abbreviation, punctuation, hyphenation, and the use of numerical figures. Some newspapers and periodicals have a style book giving rules for the preparation and editing of copy. A careful reading of several issues of a publication will show a writer the salient features of its typographical style. It is less important, however, to conform to the typographical peculiarities of any one publication than it is to follow consistently the commonly accepted rules of capitalization, punctuation, abbreviation, and "unreformed" spelling.

Printers prefer to have each page end with a complete sentence. At the close of the article it is well to put the end mark (#).

When a special feature story for newspaper publication must be prepared so hastily that there is no time to copy the first draft, it may be desirable to revise the manuscript by using the marks commonly employed in editing copy. These are as follows: Three short lines under a letter or a word indicate that it is to be set in capital letters; thus, American.

Two short lines under a letter or a word indicate that it is to be set in small capital letters; thus, NEW YORK TIMES.

One line under a word or words indicates that it is to be set in italics; thus, sine qua non.

An oblique line drawn from right to left through a capital letter indicates that it is to be set in lower case; thus, He is a sophomore.

A circle around numerical figures or abbreviations indicates that they are to be spelled out; thus, There are ten in a bushel.

A circle around words or figures spelled out indicates that they are to be abbreviated or that numerical figures are to be used; thus, Prof. A.B. Smith is 60.

A caret is placed at the point in the line where the letters or words written above the line are to be inserted; thus, It is not complimentary to him.

A line encircling two or more words like an elongated figure "8" indicates that the words are to be transposed; thus, to study carefully.

Half circles connecting words or letters indicate that they are to be brought together; thus, tomorrow.

A vertical line between parts of a word shows that the parts are to be separated; thus, all right.

A small cross or a period in a circle may be used to show that a period is to be used; thus, U.S. 4 per cent. bonds.

Quotation marks are often enclosed in half circles to indicate whether they are beginning or end marks.

The paragraph mark (¶) or the sign _| may be used to call attention to the beginning of a new paragraph.

Reference book: How To Write Special Feature Articles

Tags: writing, articles, magazine, Reading,

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